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Press Release - 24th February 2014

Barts Health leads largest ever adult stem cell heart attack trial.

Doctors at The London Chest Hospital have administered the first patient’s own stem cells in the world’s largest-ever trial of adult stem cell therapy in heart attack patients.

Patients admitted to the hospital, run by Barts Health NHS Trust, will be among the first of 3,000 individuals involved in the Europe-wide trial to test whether administering a patient’s own stem cells shortly after a heart attack will prolong life.

The patients will have their own stem cells taken from their bone marrow and injected into their heart within five days of suffering a heart attack. It is hoped that it could increase survival rates by a quarter among patients having heart attacks.

The study (BAMI) has been made possible thanks to a €5.9 million award from the European Commission and will involve 19 partners in 10 European countries.


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Press Release - 14th October 2013

The definitive adult stem cell heart attack trial has begun.

Doctors across the UK and Europe have this week recruited the first patient into the world’s largest-ever trial of adult stem cell therapy in heart attack patients.

The largest trial of its kind, it is hoped that it could increase survival rates by a quarter among patients having heart attacks.

The three thousand patients will be enrolled into the study and randomized so that half will have their own stem cells taken from their bone marrow and injected into their heart in addition to best care compared to the remaining patients who will undergo best care alone (a randomised control trial).

The study (BAMI) has been made possible thanks to a €5.9 million award from the European Commission as part of the Framework Programme 7 initiative. The BAMI study will involve 21 partners in 11 European countries. The results will be announced in 5 years and are designed to test whether stem cell therapy will save lives or not.

Globally, more than 17m people died from cardiovascular diseases last year – more than from any other cause. This landmark trial is being led by Professor Anthony Mathur from Barts Health NHS Trust, Queen Mary, University of London NIHR Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit and University College London.

About the trial Professor Mathur, said: “The BAMI study is the biggest and most comprehensive trial of its kind in the world. It has taken two years to get to the point where we are ready to accept patients, but we have now reached that stage and we are all very excited.

“Our studies will tell us if adult stem cells in bone marrow can repair damaged hearts and, if so, how these cells should be administered to patients”.

Professor John Martin (University College London) a partner in the trial said: “This trial brings together a powerful partnership of European doctors and scientists to solve a fundamental problem of importance to all people. It will give an answer about whether adult multi-potential stem cells in their natural environment can treat human disease". This study will show whether stem cell therapy works.

Professor Mathur further commented: “Stem cells are the body’s master cells. They are unique because unlike other cells, they can turn into almost any other type of cell in the body. This study will determine if adult stem cells can save lives in heart attack patients across Europe.”


Consortium Meeting - 28th June 2013

The BAMI project had a Consortium meeting on Friday 28th June 2013, at the Royal College of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians in London. The meeting was a great success with our members from across Europe in attendance. It was encouraging to know that everyone shares the same enthusiasm, drive and passion for the project.

The BAMI Trial Office (BTO) team Emma Bastian, Sheik Dowlut, Hilda Tsang, Anthony Mathur (Left to Right)

Press Release - 20 December 2011

London Chest Professor leads largest-ever heart attack trial.

20 December 2011 - Queen Mary (University of London) The largest trial of adult stem cell therapy in patients has received funding from the European Union. 3000 patients suffering heart attacks will be recruited into the trial throughout the European Union to test whether stem cells administered shortly after the heart attack will prolong life. Stem cells offer the promise of revolutionary treatment for human disease. However, a definitive test of whether they work or not in this specific case of heart treatment has been lacking. This study will provide the answer.

This is the largest trial of its kind, and it is hoped that it could increase survival rates by a quarter among patients having heart attacks. The study (BAMI) has been made possible thanks to a €5.9 million award from the European Commission. The BAMI study will involve 21 partners in 11 European countries. The results will be announced in five years and is designed to test whether stem cell therapy will save lives.

Globally, more than 17m* people died from cardiovascular diseases last year – more than from any other cause. This landmark trial is being led by Professor Anthony Mathur and colleagues from Barts and the London NHS Trust and Queen Mary, University of London NIHR Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit.

Trial Chief Co-ordinator, Professor Mathur, said: “This is the biggest and most comprehensive trials of its kind in the world.”

“Our studies will tell us if adult stem cells in bone marrow can repair damaged hearts and, if so, how these cells should be administered to patients.”

Three thousand patients will have their own stem cells taken from their bone marrow and injected into their heart within five days of suffering a heart attack.

“Professor Mathur said: “This study will determine if adult stem cells can save lives in heart attack patients across Europe.”

“Professor John Martin (University College London) a partner in the trials said: “This trial brings together a powerful partnership of European doctors and scientists to solve a fundamental problem of importance to all people. It will give an answer about whether adult multi-potential stem cells in their natural environment can treat human disease.”

The new BAMI trial is much larger in size and scope, building on their previous work in this field.

The BAMI project has been partially funded by the European Union Seventh Framework Programme for Research and Innovation (FP7)

(Ends)

The BAMI project kick off meeting was held on 1 January 2011 at the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, in Londons Regent's Park and was attended by over 30 members of the consortium from across Europe, including Charles Kessler who is the Scientific Officer for the project based at the E.U. commission in Brussels.

 

BAMI Kick Off Meeting

 

 

 

Additional Information & Downloads will be added here when available.

 

 

 

 

The BAMI project has been partially funded by

European Commission Seventh Framework Programme (FP7)

 

PROJECT COORDINATOR

Prof Anthony Mathur

Professor of Cardiology & Lead for
Clinical Cardiology

William Harvey Research Institute
Barts & The London School of
Medicine and Dentistry

John Vane Science Centre
Charterhouse Square
London, EC1M 6BQ
United Kingdom

Email : a.mathur@qmul.ac.uk